Joe Wehrle, NICB President, to Address International Association of Special Investigation Units Annual Seminar

Event Recognizes IASIU’s 30th Anniversary

_WehrleIASIU2014RevisedGREENSBORO, N.C., Sept. 15, 2014 — National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) President and Chief Executive Officer, Joe Wehrle, addresses the International Association of Special Investigation Units (IASIU) during its annual training seminar today in Greensboro.

In his remarks to the 700 in attendance, Wehrle will place special focus on emerging vehicle theft scams that utilize vehicle financing schemes and counterfeit vehicle identification numbers to obtain and resell stolen vehicles to innocent consumers or export them overseas.

“Many of today’s thefts aren’t showing up in the annual theft statistics that show a downward trend in auto theft,” says Wehrle. “That’s because they are considered financial crimes. They are impacting the manufacturers, the lenders, rental companies, the dealers and, in some instances, the insurance companies. And I’m here to tell you they are largely high dollar thefts involving newer vehicles—and they are costing the American economy millions, perhaps billions of dollars a year.”

Read the full press release.

 

NICB Report: Texas Leads the Nation in Pickup Truck Thefts

California and Florida Round Out the Top Three States

PickupTruck2014GraphicDES PLAINES, Ill., Sept. 11, 2014 — As revealed in a new report released today by the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB), pickup trucks are a popular choice for both personal and work use, and given their wide range of applications and utility, they have become a favorite target by vehicle thieves as well. Between Jan. 1, 2010, and Dec. 31, 2013, 9,441 pickup trucks were reported stolen. Full-sized pickup trucks had more thefts with 8,367 thefts versus 895 for compact pickups. Mid-sized pickup trucks had the fewest thefts with 179.

The report looks at theft data only for model years 2011, 2012 and 2013 pickups stolen between Jan. 1, 2010, and Dec. 31, 2013. The classes of pickups are compact, mid-size and full size as described in Automotive News’ Data Center.

Read the full press release in the NICB Newsroom.

 

NICB: 2013 Tailgate Thefts Rise 31 Percent Compared to 2012

Texas, California and Arizona Most Active

TailgateTheftsGraphicDES PLAINES, Ill., Sept. 3, 2014 — The National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) today released a new report that shows that insured tailgate thefts rose from 831 in 2012 to 1,090 in 2013—an increase of 31 percent.

The report reviews claims data submitted by insurance companies between Jan. 1, 2012, and Dec. 31, 2013.

The top three states for tailgate thefts during this period were: Texas (752), California (334) and Arizona (207). The cities reporting the most thefts were: Houston (145), San Antonio (125) and Dallas (91).

The top three cities for tailgate thefts were: Houston (145), San Antonio (125), and Dallas (91).

The underground market is lively for items that can be acquired at a fraction of their legitimate cost. Tailgates are no exception. While many of these stolen tailgates end up on similar vehicles, others are simply sold for scrap, which contributes to the nationwide problem of metal theft.

Tailgate thefts can occur anywhere; several episodes of multiple thefts have occurred in single locations, such as auto dealers’ lots and shopping malls. Since a tailgate theft takes just seconds to accomplish, consumers might consider using an after-market security device, such as a hinge lock to thwart criminals.

View the complete report here.

Joe Wehrle, NICB President, to Address International Financial Crimes Investigators

Insurance Fraud and its Impact on the Insurance Industry

NICB President & CEO Joe Wehrle

NICB President & CEO Joe Wehrle

PHOENIX, Ariz.—National Insurance Crime Bureau President and Chief Executive Officer, Joe Wehrle, will address the International Association of Financial Crimes Investigators during its annual training conference today in Phoenix.

Wehrle will provide an overview of the changing face of insurance fraud and how it is impacting the property and casualty insurance industry. From medical fraud rings to organized criminal elements hijacking goods from interstate transportation networks, Wehrle will describe what NICB investigators and their insurance and law enforcement colleagues are encountering across America—and what NICB is doing to stop it.

Topics to be discussed include NICB’s major medical fraud task force operations, the alarming rise in questionable claims, stolen vehicle and specialized equipment recovery efforts and NICB’s analysis of vehicle finance scams.

Wehrle will address attendees comprised of law enforcement, bank and credit card fraud investigators, retail merchant investigators and loss prevention professionals, among others, during two presentations beginning at 2:00pm today at the JW Marriott Desert Ridge Hotel. For additional information visit here.

About the IAFCI: The association, a non-profit international organization, will provide services and an environment within which information about financial fraud, fraud investigation and fraud prevention methods can be collected, exchanged and taught for the common good of the financial payment industry and our global society. To learn more visit www.iafci.org.

About the National Insurance Crime Bureau: headquartered in Des Plaines, Ill., the NICB is the nation’s leading not-for-profit organization exclusively dedicated to preventing, detecting and defeating insurance fraud and vehicle theft through data analytics, investigations, training, legislative advocacy and public awareness. The NICB is supported by more than 1,100 property and casualty insurance companies and self-insured organizations. NICB member companies wrote $371 billion in insurance premiums in 2013, or more than 78 percent of the nation’s property/casualty insurance. That includes more than 93 percent ($168 billion) of the nation’s personal auto insurance. To learn more visit www.nicb.org.

NICB’s Hot Wheels: America’s 10 Most Stolen Vehicles

NICBHotWheelsSocialDES PLAINES, Ill., Aug. 18, 2014 — The National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) today released its annual Hot Wheels report, which identifies the 10 most stolen vehicles in the United States. The report examines vehicle theft data submitted by law enforcement to the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) and determines the vehicle make, model and model year most reported stolen in 2013.

Also in today’s release is a list of the top 25 2013 vehicle makes and models that were reported stolen in calendar year 2013.

For 2013, the most stolen vehicles* in the nation were (total thefts in parentheses):

1. Honda Accord (53,995)
2. Honda Civic (45,001)
3. Chevrolet Pickup (Full Size) (27,809)
4. Ford Pickup (Full Size) (26,494)
5. Toyota Camry (14,420)
6. Dodge Pickup (Full Size) (11,347)
7. Dodge Caravan (10,911)
8. Jeep Cherokee/Grand Cherokee (9,272)
9. Toyota Corolla (9,010)
10. Nissan Altima (8,892)

Read the full press release.

Claims Journal Podcast – Anti-Fraud Legislation Mid-Year Review

Podcast - Tim LynchNICB Government Affairs Director Tim Lynch discusses the status of pending anti-fraud legislation this year and describes the positive results seen in the states of Colorado, Georgia and Minnesota.

Listen to the podcast.

For more information on NICB’s Government Affairs department, please visit us online.

NICB Celebrates 30th Anniversary of Hot Spots Vehicle Theft Report

California Is Hotter Than Ever With Nine of 10 Top Spots

NICBTimelineBlogDes Plaines, IL—Since 1984, the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) has published annual reports—known today as Hot Spots—that examine vehicle theft at the national and local level. NICB was originally established in 1912 as the Automobile Protective and Information Bureau and the company focused exclusively on recovering stolen motor vehicles that were insured by its 11 member insurance companies.

Name changes and mission expansion over the years evolved into today’s NICB—with over 1,100 member insurance companies. Although recovering stolen vehicles remains a central function at NICB, our special agents, investigative assistants, intelligence analysts, trainers, government and public affairs personnel are equally focused on other pervasive fraud schemes, particularly within the medical and commercial environments.

Read more.

NICB Names 10 Most-Stolen SUVs/CUVs

Ford Models Hold First, Second and Third Place

DES PLAINES, Ill., June 16, 2014 – The National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) today released a new report that examines thefts of sport utility vehicles (SUVs) and crossover utility vehicles (CUVs) reported stolen between Jan. 1, 2010 and Dec. 31, 2013. The data was further refined with thefts of 2011, 2012 and 2013 model year vehicles only. Using those parameters, a total of 21,711 SUVs/CUVs were reported stolen during the period.

SUVTheftsThe top five makes and models stolen during the period were: Ford Escape (1,421), Ford Edge (1,140), Ford Explorer (958), Jeep Grand Cherokee (912) and the Kia Sorento (725). In terms of class, compact CUVs experienced the most thefts with 6,981. Large CUVs were next with 3,206, followed by mid-sized CUVs (3,204), large SUVs (2,902) and premium CUVs (2,394).

The top five states for SUV/CUV thefts were California (3,531), Florida (1,897), Michigan (1,834), Texas (1,686) and New York (1,577).

 

Read the full press release.

Super Good – The Epic Fraud Fighter

SuperGoodFraudImageIf fighting fraud were made into a comic book, it might look something like this. An injustice, such as vehicle theft, has occurred. The victim calls out for help. In the near distance, the good guys come to save the day. All is set right and ends well in the world – in theory.

In reality, despite their extraordinary dedication and commitment, even fraud fighters sometimes get the blues. In the ongoing saga of fighting fraud, the “good guys” of this epic tale are fraud fighters and those of us who stand up to villains. Villains are those who participate in and perpetrate fraud schemes. But unlike Superman, The Incredible Hulk, Wonder Woman or other famed heroes, our powers, more suitably deemed abilities, aren’t extraordinary at all or the result of some scientific mishap or cosmic occurrence. Rather, they are earned responsibilities undertaken as a result of what each of us embraces and upholds.

Some days we win, and some days we lose. By win, I mean that we stop criminals from being able to further victimize the public. And by lose, I mean when the criminals are able to continue to perpetrate more fraudulent schemes. Sometimes we make headlines for taking down criminal enterprises and other illegal operations. And sometimes, the good that we do goes completely unnoticed or acknowledged by the public. Dare I say fraud fighters are sometimes even viewed as the villains or vilified for their efforts? It’s all part of the landscape. But sometimes, even the most ardent fraud fighter has probably asked himself or herself if it’s ever enough. Will this battle ever end? Why do the schemes and crimes just continue to become more and more abysmal and shocking?

Fraud isn’t just about padding a claim to get additional funds from an insurer. It’s also about people who are senselessly injured or killed by criminals staging vehicle accidents. It’s about residents of a community or employees of a company who suffer the consequences from an act of arson. It’s about the person who loses their life when a criminal purposely causes them harm to collect on a life insurance policy. The list of heinous schemes goes on and on. And the more battles that a fraud fighter encounters, the more disheartening and appalling the scenarios and schemes will inevitably become.
It would be trite to end this story with a cliché comic book expression such as “And as the public sleeps for the night, they can rest easy knowing that their heroes keep a watchful eye.” That can never be the case as long as opportunists and greed abound. They are at the root of fraud. But all is not lost. Just as new villains emerge each day, so too shall new fraud fighters. It’s the person who reports fraud or suspicious activity. It’s the person who questions their provider about a procedure that seems medically unnecessary. Whatever the case, joining the fight against fraud will not entail having to wear a cape,
leaping tall buildings, or travelling faster than a speeding bullet. One need only subscribe to the belief that fraud must be defeated whenever and wherever it exists.

Watercraft Thefts Sink by 6 Percent in 2013

WaterCraftInfographicWebDES PLAINES, Ill., May 19, 2014 — With summer and boating season just around the corner, the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) today released its latest report on watercraft theft and recoveries in the United States. The report examines watercraft* reported stolen between Jan. 1 and Dec. 31, 2013. The report draws from data contained in the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) database for all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Overall, there were 5,537 watercraft thefts reported during 2013, and that is a 6 percent decrease from the 5,870 thefts reported in 2012.

The top five states for thefts in descending order were: Florida (1,310), California (628), Texas (382), Washington (208) and Georgia (182). No watercraft thefts were reported from Hawaii and the District of Columbia.

The top five types of watercraft stolen in 2013 were in identical order to last year’s report. In first place was the “Jet Ski” category, which recorded 1,215 thefts. It was followed by, in descending order, runabout (871), utility (363), cruiser (214) and sailboat (44).

Read the full press release.