NICB in the News: Staged Accidents, Severe Storms and Airbag Thefts

(The Bulletin) Norwich man sentenced for his role in car insurance fraud scheme

NEW HAVEN — A Norwich man was sentenced Friday in federal court to 100 days in prison followed by three years of supervised release for his role in an insurance fraud scheme.

Frandy Dugue, 40, known as Jimmy, was sentenced by U.S. District Judge Jeffrey Alker Meyer in New Haven.

According to court documents and statements made in court, between April 2011 and April 2014, Dugue and others conspired to stage approximately 50 car crashes in Eastern Connecticut for the purpose of defrauding automobile insurance companies.

Read the full story here.


(USAgNet)Following Severe Weather, Beware of Scams

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine warned consumers to beware of scams following the severe weather that hit Ohio this past week.

“Bad weather, unfortunately, can lead to scams,” Attorney General DeWine said. “Some con artists will travel to storm-damaged communities, go door to door offering immediate work, and then leave after taking someone’s money. Another risk, with all the flooding we’ve had, is for flood-damaged cars to eventually make their way to the market. We just warn people to be careful. Scams are out there, but prevention can go a long way.”

Read the story here.


(NBC Miami)Residents Frustrated By String of Airbag Thefts in Southwest Miami-

For the second time in less than two months, neighbors in a Southwest Miami-Dade neighborhood have been targeted by thieves who have swept through parking lots stealing airbags from vehicles.

Read the full story here.


(Bismarck Tribune)Fargo man accused of claiming tools to defraud insurance company

A man who was in a rollover car crash in January 2016 is accused of trying to get extra insurance money by pretending tools were stolen from his car.

A criminal complaint filed July 7 against Dakotah Gries, 24, of Fargo, alleges he submitted a fake receipt to State Farm in the hopes of getting paid for tools he said were stolen, but which he had never owned.

For the full story click here.

NICB in the News: Staged Crashes, Mystery Devices and Hail Damage

WINK NEWS Fraud could be behind a recent surge in auto insurance rates.

Rates are up 21.4 percent since 2015, according to Florida Office of Insurance Regulation data. Read the story here.


KCAL9 – Police Say Car Thieves Targeting Vehicles With Keyless Entry

Police say criminals can use key fobs to disarm cars with the convenient entry option. Now they’re recommending car owners use The Club, which locks onto the steering wheel. Read the story here.


Insurance Business – How bad is your state for hail?

New data from the National Insurance Crime Bureau has listed hail as a top culprit for damaging motor vehicles. Read the story here.

 

Staged Auto Accidents Are Still Big Business

CarCrashDespite the rapid increase in fraud due to identity theft and other schemes, staged auto accidents are still big business. Staged accident rings are typically highly organized – often just as organized as a legitimate business would be! They are usually controlled by one or more individuals and tend to be closely associated with certain law offices and/or medical clinics. It’s not uncommon to see family members, friends, co-workers and neighbors working side-by-side to commit this fraud. Newer and/or commercial vehicles are often targeted since they tend to be insured. These schemes result in higher insurance premiums for all of us.

What can you do?

If you suspect someone of committing fraud through a staged accident scheme, report it anonymously to NICB one of these three ways:

  • Complete and submit the form available online on the NICB Website. Your contact information is not required.
  • You can also call the NICB Hotline at 800.TEL.NICB (800.835.6422), staffed Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Central Time.
  • Cell phone users can text the keyword “FRAUD” and their tip to TIP411 (847411). Plus, iPhone or iPad users can download the NICB Fraud Tips app to make it easy to quickly send a tip and get a response.

To learn more about NICB, visit www.NICB.org.

Insurance Fraud Headlines for May 26, 2015

Here are the top insurance fraud stories for today:

camero1* Nearly 500,000 Camero Thefts Have Occurred Since 1981(NICB)

* 30 more arrested for fire, water damage home insurance fraud (Tampa Tribune)

* Worker’s Compensation Fraudsters Caught Faking Injuries (ABC 20/20)

* An unusual car-theft trend hits Palm Springs (The Desert Sun)

* Car Sellers Beware, Attorney General Reports (Pine Bluff Commercial)

* Women, trucks, commercial vehicles prime targets for accident-stagers (Las Vegas Review Journal)

 

Insurance Fraud Headlines for May 13, 2015

Here are the top insurance fraud stories for today:

* Egg Harbor man who allegedly staged accident pleads not guilty to fraud (NJ.com)

* Woman faces charges after claiming her storage unit was burglarized (WAFB TV)

* Bucks County DA gets insurance fraud unit (WFMZ News)

* Police Charge Firefighter in Insurance Fraud Investigation (Insurance Journal)

* Auto theft, insurance fraud are focus of LI police conference (Newsday)

* Insurance Fraud May Not Be What You Think It Is (Yousefian Law)

 

Insurance Fraud Headlines for May 6, 2015

Here are the top insurance fraud headlines for today:

* Dozens Accused of Insurance Fraud, Auto Theft (KATC)

* Ex-state worker falsified insurance cards, stole food stamp benefits (NJ.com)

* Murder trial begins for man police say staged accident as cover up (CBS 21 News)

* Insurers See Impact from Wearable Devices Within 2 Years (Insurance Journal)

Car Crashes Caught on Camera

CarCrash1Thousands of insurance claims are made every day in this country for auto accidents. They add up to some $125 billion dollars in payments by insurers. With that many claims there’s also a significant amount of fraud. That’s why it’s important to be able to sort out fact from fiction.

Roger Morris has the story of how one company is putting on crash demonstrations for insurance industry claims experts. This type of experience helps to give them a firsthand look at what happens in a real accident as opposed to a staged accident.