Home for the Holidays? Not If You’re a Car Thief

DES PLAINES, Ill. –New data released today by the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) shows a total of 22,705 vehicles were reported stolen on the 11 holidays in 2016 covered in this report. NICB theft data is pulled from the National Crime Information Center’s (NCIC) stolen vehicle file which showed a total of 803,719 vehicle thefts for the year.

Halloween was the top holiday with 2,578 reported thefts. Halloween was followed, in descending order, by Labor Day (2,258), New Year’s Day (2,242), Memorial Day (2,139) and New Year’s Eve (2,110).

Download the complete report here and an infographic here.

The holidays with the fewest thefts in 2016 were: Christmas Day (1,664), Thanksgiving (1,777), Valentine’s Day (1,789), President’s Day (2,008) and Christmas Eve (2,054).

Holidays ranked by the number of thefts in 2016 were:

1. Halloween (2,578)
2. Labor Day (2,258)
3. New Year’s Day (2,242)
4. Memorial Day (2,139)
5. New Year’s Eve (2,110)
6. Independence Day (2,086)
7. Christmas Eve (2,054)
8. President’s Day (2,008)
9. Valentine’s Day (1,789)
10. Thanksgiving (1,777)
11. Christmas Day (1,664)

California was the number one state with the most holiday vehicle thefts in 2016 with 5,285. It was followed by, in descending order, Texas (2,121), Florida (1,397), Washington (889) and Georgia (763).

NICB reminds drivers to be vigilant and to secure their cars during this season as vehicle thieves are not filled with the holiday spirit. Some will definitely make a gift to themselves of your vehicle if you make it easy for them.

‘Tis the Season to Steal

cr122k15-gift_car_openerWhen you’re making the rounds at the stores this holiday season, make sure your car isn’t on someone’s gift list. Unattended vehicles, especially those loaded with valuables, make attractive targets for thieves.

New data released today by the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) shows a total of 9,600 vehicles were reported stolen in 2015 on Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day.

Holiday vehicle thieves had their busiest day in 2015 on Halloween, stealing 2,238 vehicles according to NICB’s 2015 Annual Holiday Vehicle Theft Report. Theft data is culled from the National Crime Information Center’s (NCIC) stolen vehicle file, which showed a total of 759,237 vehicle thefts for the year.

After Halloween, New Year’s Eve was the next most active holiday with 2,227 thefts. Labor Day came in third with 2,171 thefts followed by Christmas Eve with 2,071 thefts. Memorial Day rounds out the top five holidays for 2015 with 2,040 thefts.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, the holidays with the fewest thefts in 2015 were: Christmas Day (1,620); Thanksgiving (1,653); Valentine’s Day (1,690); President’s Day (1,787) and Independence Day (1,981).

Holidays ranked by the number of thefts in 2015 were:

  1. Halloween (2,238)
  2. New Year’s Eve (2,227)
  3. Labor Day (2,171)
  4. Christmas Eve (2,071)
  5. Memorial Day (2,040)
  6. New Year’s Day (2,029)
  7. Independence Day (1,981)
  8. President’s Day (1,787)
  9. Valentine’s Day (1,690)
  10. Thanksgiving (1,653)
  11. Christmas Day (1,620)

While the holiday with the most thefts was Halloween, the most thefts on a single day in all of 2015 occurred on Monday, June 15, with 2,579.

A special feature included in today’s report is a look at vehicle thefts occurring on Black Friday, the day after Thanksgiving, which is widely viewed as the start of the holiday shopping season. In recent years, many national retailers have launched Black Friday specials on Thanksgiving evening while families may still be carving their turkeys.

The lure of added shopping hours—and the presence of unattended vehicles in store parking lots—may be contributing to higher vehicle thefts on Black Friday.

The following graph shows the number of vehicle thefts reported on Thanksgiving Day and Black Friday from 2011 through 2015. There are, on average, over 30 percent more vehicle thefts on Black Friday than the day before. Moreover, the 2,244 thefts on Black Friday in 2015 were more than the 2,080 average daily thefts for the entire year.

 Year Thanksgiving Day  Black Friday   % Increase
2011  1,526 2,034 33
2012  1,656 2,077 25
2013  1,353 1,750 29
2014  1,384 1,838 33
2015  1,653 2,244 36


NICB reminds drivers this holiday season to make sure your vehicle is locked when unattended. Don’t leave spare keys or FOBS inside. Take a moment and be sure to hide your valuables from view. Even an empty backpack looks appealing to a thief from the outside.

If stopping at several locations to shop, remember to first store your packages in your trunk before leaving one destination for the next. Thieves are known to watch shoppers who place items in their trunks and then head for the stores—that invites trouble.

See the full holiday vehicle theft report here and an infographic here.

2015nicbholidaytheftreport

Halloween Is Fright Night for Car Thieves

car-thief-halloween

Halloween thefts for four of the past five years were higher than the daily average.

As Halloween approaches, there may be more than ghouls, gremlins and witches canvassing the landscape. How many car thieves will also be prowling the nation’s streets this Halloween disguised as trick-or-treaters as they case neighborhoods for their next target?

The National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) has been analyzing and reporting on vehicle theft activity for over 100 years. While we’ve published hundreds of reports about vehicle theft over the years, this is the first time we have approached the topic to see what effect, if any, Halloween has on vehicle theft.

NICB examined 2011-2015 vehicle theft data contained in the National Crime Information Center’s (NCIC) Stolen Vehicle File to produce daily reported theft totals and then pulled the numbers for October 31—Halloween. The result is a straightforward presentation of theft statistics linked to Halloween, the annual celebration with roots in the Celtic festival of Samhain.

The average daily theft totals for each of the past five years was determined and then compared with the thefts reported on Halloween. Halloween thefts for four of the five years were higher than the daily average. One year, 2012, had fewer thefts.

halloweenthefts2015

So, the question remains. Is there a link between Halloween and vehicle theft? Is the behavior of vehicle thieves affected by this annual celebration? Maybe. But during the last five years the data shows more theft activity on October 31—and that’s no trick, or treat.

 

 

Car Thieves Don’t Take a Break for the Holidays

Shoppers heading out to pick up holiday gifts this season may fall victim to car thieves, and the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) is working to help make the public more aware of theft.

The NICB issued this public service announcement across the country this month, making sure everyone is on the same page when it comes to holiday shopping this year.

Top Holidays for Vehicle Theft in 2014

Holiday car thieves had their busiest day in 2014 on, ironically, Labor Day, stealing 2,200 vehicles according to new data released today by the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB). NICB’s 2014 Annual Holiday Vehicle Theft Report analyzes data from the National Crime Information Center (NCIC), which showed a total of 695,246 vehicle thefts for the year.

After Labor Day, New Year’s Day was the next most active holiday with 2,011 thefts. Halloween came in third with 2,010 thefts followed by Memorial Day with 1,933 thefts. Independence Day rounds out the top five holidays for 2014 with 1,877 thefts.

The holidays with the fewest thefts in 2014 were Christmas Day with 1,225 thefts and Thanksgiving with 1,384 thefts.

Holidays ranked by the number of thefts in 2014 were:

2014HolidayVehicleThefts
By comparison, the day with the most thefts in all of 2014 was July 7 with 2,361.

NICB reminds drivers this holiday season when leaving your vehicle for whatever reason to take a moment and be sure to hide your valuables from view. Even an empty backpack looks appealing to a thief from the outside.

See the full holiday vehicle theft report here. Watch a video report here.