Stolen 1964 Corvette Stingray Returned After 40 Years

In this edition of Fraud Files we have the story of a 1964 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray that was stolen in 1976 and recovered some 40 years later. With the help of a California Highway Patrol officer and a little bit of research from the NICB the original owner was reunited with her prized vehicle after four decades.

To view more editions of Fraud Files click here.

Two Stolen Vehicles Valued at $96,000 Recovered in Michigan

In this edition of Fraud Files we take a look at the recovery of a 2016 Chevrolet Corvette and a 2015 Ford F-150 with a total value of $96,000.

StolenCorvette

This 2016 Chevrolet Corvette was recovered at the scene

A Michigan man was arrested and charged with allegedly using false identification to purchase the vehicles from dealerships and financing them using stolen identities. Recovered at the scene were a 2016 Chevrolet Corvette with a value of over $63,000 as well as a 2015 Ford F-150 with a value of over $33,000. Both vehicles had theft claims on them.

The subject was arrested and charged in a nine count felony complaint and was also charged as a habitual offender. The National Insurance Crime Bureau assisted in the investigation.

Insurance Fraud Headlines for June 10, 2015

Here are the top insurance fraud stories for today:

Courtesy: Allstate

Courtesy: Allstate

* Allstate Reunites Owner with ’72 Corvette 43 Years After It Was Stolen (Insurance Journal)

* Alleged arsonist suing for insurance money (Bangor Daily News)

* Woman Allegedly Involved In Fraudulent Billing Medicaid $13,000 (NY.gov)

* Louisiana bill allowing license plate readers to spot uninsured motors (The Advocate)

Nixon Arias* Man commits insurance fraud using ID of a deceased individual (Command Investigations)

NICB’s Hot Wheels Classic Report: Chevrolet Corvette

NICB’s recently released Hot Wheel’s Classic report takes a look at the theft of Chevrolet Corvettes over the past 30 years. The following is taken from a press release issued by Frank Scafidi, director or public affairs.

A Truly Hot Car – More Than One in 10 Stolen Over Past 30 Years

Although racing purists might recognize the Stutz Bearcat or the Mercer Raceabout as America’s first sports cars, there is no question that the Chevrolet Corvette holds the title as America’s oldest, continuously produced sports car.

In this, NICB’s second Hot Wheels Classics report, we look at how the Corvette has fared as a theft target. For a video report on Corvette thefts, click here.

A Little Corvette History

The public saw the Corvette for the first time in January 1953, at the Motorama Show held at New York City’s Waldorf Astoria hotel. It went into full production on June 30, 1953, at the General Motors facility in Flint, Mich. By the end of the year, 300 were produced—all of them white convertibles with red interiors and black soft tops. The price tag was $3,498 with a heater and AM radio as the only options.

In 1954, Corvette production moved to a renovated facility in St. Louis, Mo., where it remained until 1981. That year, Corvette production moved into a new assembly facility at Bowling Green, Ky., where Corvettes continue to roll off the line today.

The first-generation Corvette—C1s as they are known—were manufactured from 1953-1962. Successive generations appeared in 1963 (C2); 1968 (C3); 1984 (C4); 1997 (C5); and in 2005 with the C6. A seventh-generation Corvette is expected sometime next year.

At the 1978 Indianapolis 500 Mile Race, Corvette made the first of its 10 appearances as the official Indy 500 Pace Car, an unmatched record on two counts—most appearances as a pace car and most consecutive years pacing the field (2004-2008).

Often compared to more exotic European sports cars, the Corvette has performed well in racing circuits around the globe. However, with the introduction of the supercharged, 620hp ZR-1 in 2009, Corvette has convinced its few remaining skeptics that it can perform on the world racing stage, as well as (and mostly better than) cars three times its price tag.

It’s no surprise then to find Corvette owners doting over their cars and keeping them in showroom condition. But like other items of high value and popular attraction, they get stolen. NICB reviewed Corvette theft data from 1953-2011 and identified 134,731 theft records. However, since the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration required vehicle identification number (VIN) standardization beginning with the 1981 model year, confidence in pre-1981 records is low due to the inconsistency in reporting protocols and VIN systems. Consequently, only 1981 and later data was used to produce this report.

 Visit www.nicb.org to read the full press release.