Motorcycle Thefts Increase Two Percent in 2016

Honda’s were the most stolen motorcycles in 2016.

DES PLAINES, Ill. – The National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) today released a report on motorcycle thefts in the United States for 2016. A total of 46,467 motorcycles were reported stolen in 2016 compared with 45,555 reported stolen in 2015—an increase of two percent.

Although 2016 delivered another slight increase in motorcycle thefts, motorcycle thefts are down considerably since 2006. They have dropped from 66,774 in 2006 to 46,467 in 2016—a decline of 30 percent.

The top 10 states with the most reported motorcycles thefts in 2016 were California (7,506), Florida (4,482), Texas (3,692), South Carolina (2,057), North Carolina (1,847), New York (1,731), Indiana (1,397), Georgia (1,296), Missouri (1,195), and Nevada (1,177).

The top 10 cities for motorcycle thefts in 2016 were New York (1,209), San Diego (849), Las Vegas (818), Los Angeles (760) San Francisco (616), Miami (610), Houston (607), San Antonio (411), Phoenix (347), and Austin, Texas, (343).

The top 10 most stolen motorcycles in 2016 by manufacturer were American Honda Motor Co., Inc. (9,052 thefts), Yamaha Motor Corporation (7,723), American Suzuki Motor Corporation (6,229), Kawasaki Motors Corp., U.S.A. (5,221), Harley Davidson, Inc. (4,953), Taotao Group Co. Ltd (2,673), KTM Sportmotorcycle AG (762), Ducati Motor Holding (521), Genuine Cycle (463), and Kymco U.S.A., Inc. (453).

The most motorcycle thefts occurred in August (5,251) and the fewest in February (2,547) which continues to reflect a weather-influenced pattern that is consistent with previous years. Download the complete report here and an infographic here.

Hot Spots in the Media

Here’s a list of media outlets who have picked up on our annual Hot Spots report:

Screen Shot 2016-06-06 at 11.53.40 AM
NICB’s 2015 Hot Spots Vehicle Theft Report

 

200px-Bloomberg_News_logo
Modesto Tops San Francisco With Worst Vehicle-Theft Rate in U.S.

 

FI-LosAngelesTimes-LOGO
Car thieves love L.A.: California leads the nation (again) in auto thefts

Screen Shot 2016-06-06 at 12.09.59 PM
Top 100 Metro Areas for Vehicle Theft: NICB’s ‘Hot Spots’

 

Screen Shot 2016-06-06 at 12.16.13 PM
Bakersfield ranks No. 3 in nation for car thefts per capita

 

Screen Shot 2016-06-06 at 12.20.36 PM
California
owns eight of the top 10 hot spots for vehicle theft

Eight California Metro Areas Place in Top 10 For Vehicle Theft

Computer generated 3D photo rendering.

California owned eight of the the top 10 hot sports for vehicle theft in 2015.

California’s Modesto Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) had the nation’s highest per capita vehicle theft rate in 2015, according to the National Insurance Crime Bureau’s (NICB) latest Hot Spots report. Moreover, California owned eight of the top 10 hot spots for vehicle theft in 2015.

NICB’s Hot Spots report examines vehicle theft data obtained from the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) for each of the nation’s MSAs. MSAs are designated by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and often include areas much larger than the cities for which they are named. For example, the number one spot, the Modesto, Calif. MSA, includes all thefts within the entire county of Stanislaus, not just the city of Modesto.

Moreover, as a population-based survey, an area with a much smaller population and a moderate number of thefts can—and often does—have a higher theft rate than an area with a much more significant vehicle theft problem and a larger population to absorb it.

For 2015, the 10 MSAs with the highest vehicle theft rates were: (thefts in parentheses)

2015 Ranking 2014 Ranking
1. Modesto, Calif. (4,072) 5 (3,047)
2. Albuquerque, N.M. (6,657) 12 (4,754)
3. Bakersfield, Calif. (6,000) 2 (5,211)
4. Salinas, Calif. (2,934) 11 (2,270)
5. San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, Calif. (30,554) 1 (29,093)
6. Stockton-Lodi, Calif. (4,656) 3 (4,245)
7. Pueblo, Colo. (983) 24 (654)
8. Merced, Calif. (1,605) 21 (1,132)
9. Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, Calif. (25,001) 14 (21,264)
10. Vallejo-Fairfield, Calif. (2,352) 7 (2,414)

When the FBI released preliminary, January-June 2015 crime data earlier this year, vehicle theft was up one percent across the nation. That increase is reflected in today’s Hot Spots report and the trend may hold when the final FBI 2015 crime data is published in the fall.

car-traffic_z1HStUFdNotwithstanding these occasional increases, vehicle thefts are down dramatically around the nation over the last several years. Nonetheless, the reasons vehicles are stolen remain the same. Older vehicles are stolen primarily for their parts value while newer, high-end vehicles are often shipped overseas or, after some disguising, sold to an innocent buyer locally.

The full Hot Spots report is available at www.nicb.org. See the Hot Spots video here.

NICB recommends that drivers follow our four “layers of protection” to guard against vehicle theft:

Common Sense — the common sense approach to protection is the easiest and most cost- effective way to thwart would-be thieves. You should always:
    • Remove your keys from the ignition
    • Lock your doors /close your windows
    • Park in a well-lit area

Warning Device — the second layer of protection is a visible or audible device which alerts thieves that your vehicle is protected. Popular devices include:

    • Audible alarms
    • Steering column collars
    • Steering wheel/brake pedal lock
    • Brake locks
    • Wheel locks
    • Theft deterrent decals
    • Identification markers in or on vehicle
    • VIN etching

Immobilizing Device — the third layer of protection is a device which prevents thieves from bypassing your ignition and hot-wiring the vehicle. Some electronic devices have computer chips in ignition keys. Other devices inhibit the flow of electricity or fuel to the engine until a hidden switch or button is activated. Some examples are:

    • Smart keys
    • Fuse cut-offs
    • Kill switches
    • Starter, ignition, and fuel pump disablers
    • Wireless ignition authentication

Tracking Device — the final layer of protection is a tracking device which emits a signal to police or a monitoring station when the vehicle is stolen. Tracking devices are very effective in helping authorities recover stolen vehicles. Some systems employ “telematics” which combine GPS and wireless technologies to allow remote monitoring of a vehicle. If the vehicle is moved, the system will alert the owner and the vehicle can be tracked via computer.

 

Downward Trend in Motorcycle Thefts Continues


ladro di motoDES PLAINES, Ill., Oct. 28, 2015 — The National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) today released a report on motorcycle thefts in the United States for 2014. A total of 42,856 motorcycles were reported stolen in 2014 compared with 45,367 reported stolen in 2013—a decrease of six percent.

This is welcome news for motorcycle owners since the drop comes at a time when overall motorcycle sales in 2014 increased by four percent over their 2013 total1.

The top 10 states with the most reported motorcycles thefts in 2014 were California (6,355), Florida (3,981), Texas (3,274), South Carolina (2,146), North Carolina (2,117), New York (1,544), Indiana (1,508), Nevada (1,488), Georgia (1,455) and Maryland (1,127).

The top 10 cities for motorcycle thefts in 2014 were Las Vegas (1,163), New York (1,034), San Diego (650), Miami (541), San Francisco (516), San Antonio (447), Houston (439), Indianapolis (422), Los Angeles (397) and Albuquerque, N.M. (390).

The top 10 most stolen motorcycles in 2014 by manufacturer were American Honda Motor Co., Inc. (8,045), Yamaha Motor Corporation (6,728), American Suzuki Motor Corporation (5,987), Kawasaki Motors Corp., U.S.A. (4,497), Harley Davidson, Inc. (4,146), Taotao Group Co. Ltd (1,730), Astronautical Bashan (535), Jonway Group Co., Ltd. (503), KTM Sportmotorcycle AG (489) and Genuine Cycle (449).

The most motorcycle thefts occurred in August (4,965) and the fewest in February (1,978) reflecting a weather-influenced pattern that is consistent with previous years.

The complete report is available here or by pasting /File%20Library/Public%20Affairs/2014-Motorcycle-ForeCAST-Report-Public.pdf into your browser.

1. As reported by the Motorcycle Industry Council

Anyone with information concerning insurance fraud or vehicle theft can report it anonymously by calling toll-free 800-TEL-NICB (800-835-6422), texting keyword “fraud” to TIP411 (847411) or submitting a form on our website. Or, download the NICB Fraud Tips app on your iPhone or Android device.

NICB News: Fall 2015 – The Aftermath of the California Wildfires

In this edition of NICB News we feature the devastation of the wildfires in northern California, a look back at the 10 year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, the latest Hot Wheels report and more.

To view previous episodes of NICB News click here.

Hurricane Katrina 10 Years Later: Coast to Coast Impact – Part 4

Today’s video segment shows how in the weeks and months after Katrina, NICB agents were finding vehicles damaged by floodwaters for sale from New York to California. These potential coffins on wheels were just waiting to be purchased by unsuspecting consumers.

To view the other parts of this series click here.

2014 Hot Spots Vehicle Theft Report

stolen-carDes Plaines, Ill—California’s San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) had the nation’s highest per capita vehicle theft rate in 2014, according to the National Insurance Crime Bureau’s (NICB) latest Hot Spots report. NICB’s Hot Spots report examines vehicle theft data obtained from the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) for each of the nation’s MSAs. MSAs are designated by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and often include areas much larger than the cities for which they are named. For example, the Bakersfield, Calif., MSA includes all thefts within the entire county of Kern, not just the city of Bakersfield. Moreover, as a population-based survey, an area with a much smaller population and a moderate number of thefts can—and often does—have a higher theft rate than an area with a much more significant vehicle theft problem and a larger population to absorb it. For 2014, the 10 MSAs with the highest vehicle theft rates were: (thefts in parentheses)

2014HotSpotsRankings

Although vehicle thefts are down dramatically around the nation, the reasons they are stolen remain the same. Older vehicles are stolen primarily for their parts value while newer, high- end vehicles often are shipped overseas or, after some disguising, sold to an innocent buyer locally.

Others, meanwhile, are still taken for the oldest of motivations—a “joyride” and when the thrill is gone, it is abandoned undamaged. The full Hot Spots report is available at www.nicb.org. NICB recommends that drivers follow our four “layers of protection” to guard against vehicle theft: Common Sense The common sense approach to protection is the easiest and most cost- effective way to thwart would-be thieves. You should always:

  • Remove your keys from the ignition
  • Lock your doors /close your windows
  • Park in a well-lit area

Warning Device — The second layer of protection is a visible or audible device which alerts thieves that your vehicle is protected. Popular devices include:

  • Audible alarms
  • Steering column collars
  • Steering wheel/brake pedal lock
  • Brake locks
  • Wheel locks
  • Theft deterrent decals
  • Identification markers in or on vehicle
  • VIN etching
  • Micro dot marking

Immobilizing Device — The third layer of protection is a device which prevents thieves from bypassing your ignition and hot-wiring the vehicle. Some electronic devices have computer chips in ignition keys. Other devices inhibit the flow of electricity or fuel to the engine until a hidden switch or button is activated. Some examples are:

  • Smart keys
  • Fuse cut-offs
  • Kill switches
  • Starter, ignition, and fuel pump disablers
  • Wireless ignition authentication
Tracking Device — The final layer of protection is a tracking device which emits a signal to police or a monitoring station when the vehicle is stolen. Tracking devices are very effective in helping authorities recover stolen vehicles. Some systems employ “telematics” which combine GPS and wireless technologies to allow remote monitoring of a vehicle. If the vehicle is moved, the system will alert the owner and the vehicle can be tracked via computer.

 
Here’s a report from Bloomberg Radio on the trend in California.